Victorian Bulldog Information

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Victorian Bulldogs are similar in appearance to English Bulldogs. The only difference is in size because Victorian Bulldogs are much larger. Their head is round and sports the distinctive short flat bulldog muzzle. The breed’s small ears fold over into a “V” shape on the side of their head. Their small, dark eyes sit back in the head and are far apart. Like many bulldog breeds, their lower jaw protrudes farther than their upper jaw.  Under their short muzzles, their lips hang loose past their lower jaw. Their head leads directly into their wide, muscular necks which are covered with excess skin – another hallmark of many similar breeds.  Because of their extra height, their legs are much longer than an English Bulldog’s, even though their head is smaller. At the end of those lengthy legs are large, round paws.  Victorian Bulldogs have short, smooth coats which come in many colors, such as pure white, brindle, solid red, fallow, fawn, or white with spots of other colors.

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Character

Victorian Bulldogs are wonderful family dogs. They are good with children and dogs who share their homes, but they are sometimes unfriendly with new dogs. The breed adores getting attention from people. Although Victorian Bulldogs are extremely gentle, they will protect their family. The Victorian Bulldog is a sweet and playful breed that is also great for older people and young families. They also get along with other non-canine animals, too.

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Size

16-19 inches
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Weight

55-75 pounds
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General Health

Ken Mollett, the breed’s originator, was dedicated to rejuvenating the classic bulldog look by breeding only healthy dogs.  As a result, the Victorian Bulldog is free of genetic issues and is a very hardy breed.   The dogs can live to be 12 to 15 years of age.

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History

In the 1980s, Mollett decided to start a line of bulldogs because the modern Bulldogs had become so unhealthy. He planned to make Bulldogs that resembled the bulldogs in old pictures. To do this, he crossed the healthiest Bulldogs, Staffords, Bullmastiffs, and Dogue de Bordeaux he could find. By 1985, Mollett had designed a dog breed that closely resembled that of Victorian Bulldogs and was healthier than English Bulldogs. Unfortunately, it is rare to find a real Victorian Bulldog because very few from the bloodline exist.

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Maintenance

This breed is easy to groom. To keep their coat looking its best all it needs is to be brushed about once a week. Most importantly is to clean their face with a damp cloth regularly because dirt, food, and debris can build up in their deep wrinkles. For exercise, all the breed needs are regular walks. Even though they are not extremely active dogs, they should still get some exercise and play daily. What Victorian Bulldogs need most to keep them happy is lots of attention and time with their families.

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Ideal Environment

Victorian Bulldogs are great in apartments and houses. They are not overly active so as long as they get walks a yard is not necessary. They need a family who has lots of time because they love attention. They can be around children of all ages and are fine with other animals. They can protect the family but are also great with strangers and are never timid. The breed makes great companions for older people and young families alike. However, environment is important to them because they cannot stand extremely hot or cold temperatures, so they do best in moderate climates. They need to be an inside dog because of their need to be with people and their low resistance to harsh weather. They also need a family who does not mind loud snoring or excessive drooling.

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Dog Training!

If you're having problems training your dog or getting control, you should read our review of DogProblems.com. Adam will do whatever it takes to help you whip your dog into shape. I've used them to help with my Great Dane as well as help friends train their dogs. It's the first place I go to help answer users Questions. Many training issues are too extensive to answer in this forum, which is why I refer a lot of the load to his site. Update: I've been using and recommending DogProblems for three years now. I, as well as my users, value the techniques we've learned. I get weekly emails from users who have become better owners from the information they received.

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Victorian Bulldog Q&A

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how long does it take from breeding to birth ?

63 days

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Our Victorian Bulldog is very shy. What is the best way to help her? We have just finished her last round of shots and were wanting to take her to Puppy classes to help her socialize - is this a good idea?

Our guy is also very shy around new people...took him to the dog park a few times and it seems to have helped!

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My female went into heat at 6 1/2 months she now 13 months is this normal for them to come into heat so soon?

yes it will help its importent to lett your dog before he is 12 weeks old to take him ervery where so hil or she will be a great dog and then the are scared for nothing a good sociale dog

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do i need to put something on his nose? It is so dry. He is Very Healthy, just worried about his nose. Any thoughts

it may be genetic

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im getting a victorian bulldog pup and she has cherry eye is it an easy fix

Yes this is very easy to fix a simple surgery can be done what is called tucking it's easy on your love little furball. I actually have a Victorian Bulldog and he had both eyes that had Cherry eyes and then by the time he was 6 months and my vet did an awesome job and now he has no problem but they do definitely recommend doing a tuck not a removal because removal could cause excessive drying of the eyes which is why a reputable vet will recommend tucking vs. Removing so just do your research.

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