German Shorthaired Pointer Q&A

how do you know when it's time to put them down. mine is 11 yrs old. he has lumps all over, he has too much trouble breathing, and his legs and hips are bad. at the same time he eats like a horse , although he's way skinnier than he used to be, 150 lbs verses 180 top weight he still runs and plays as much as he can than runs out of air and also he can,t control his bowel movement mostly at night.. he also does not seem to be in any pain i,m stumped. am i being cruel to keep him alive

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Having to have had my Great Dane put down myself this year, I understand your question only too well. It is difficult to lay down general rule on when the right time has come, but there is one thought I wish to relay - Danes are dignified, proud creatures and they want to go down in dignity. If breathing and relieving himself becomes too laborious or uncontrolled, feel his heart and ask yourself if that is still who he would want to be. Also inquire with your vet what the most likely scenarios will be - if the vet foresees a possible collapse, suffocation, or internal bleeding as a realistic threat, spare your prince the agony before he gets there.


Having to have had my Great Dane put down myself this year, I understand your question only too well. It is difficult to lay down general rule on when the right time has come, but there is one thought I wish to relay - Danes are dignified, proud creatures and they want to go down in dignity. If breathing and relieving himself becomes too laborious or uncontrolled, feel his heart and ask yourself if that is still who he would want to be. Also inquire with your vet what the most likely scenarios will be - if the vet foresees a possible collapse, suffocation, or internal bleeding as a realistic threat, spare your prince the agony before he gets there.


Having had to put my Dane to sleep a few months ago due to spinal issues that progressed to paralysis over only a couple days I was fortunate because I had to doubt that it was time to end her suffering. The biggest question you have to ask yourself is what his quality of life is like. I would definitely ask your vet their thoughts because of course certain issues can be well managed with medications but keep in mind that dogs don't usually show pain the way humans do. Changes in bathroom habits, appetite, not greeting you when you get home, and not being excited for activities they previously enjoyed are all signs of pain and discomfort. The most concerning issue you mentioned was his increase work of breathing, It could be many things but particularly concerning if it's heart failure that causes the lungs to fill with fluid so they are literally DROWNING to death on dry land, so please please please see your vet quickly! I had found a great website with a questionnaire on quality of life that you may find helpful for knowing when it's time http://transitionsvet.com/quality-of-life/ I too have another Dane that is 11 and while she is certainly showing her age, she still has quite a bit of life left in her so we will just take it one day at time.



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