Lhasa Apso Q&A

I am considering buying a Walker to use as a house pet for my kids and a hunting companion for me, however, can they be contained in my yard using a wireless fencing system or will their hunting instincts take over and thus run through the fencing border?

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Answers (9)

We have a 9 year old walker and the invisible electric fence definitely keeps her home. Our electricity even went out for a week recently after a bad storm but she'd gotten so used to the fence that she didn't realize it was gone. We love it.


My fence is only about 2.5 ft tall and he's plenty big enough to just jump over but he's not that smart!


My male is only one year old but he stays in the fence. He will open the gate just enough for the little dog to get out if someone is outside of the fence. I believe he is just trying to get the little one in trouble.


I probably would suggest you to buy another breed. THEY ARE difficult to be trained, just difficult........


I have a 1.5 year old female Walker and she easily goes over my 9 foot fence, also the previous owner had the invisible fence and collar thing the dog could care less, she was on the hunt and took off all the time, She now has to be tethered in the yard, but beware they go to bayin when they are alone


Hunting instincts may very well take over, plus Walkers have a very high pain tolerance. Electric fencing is definitely not recommended. The breed makes wonderful indoor family members....give it a try!!


Have a 2 y/o TW since he was 6 weeks old. Had a lot of problems with him picking up a scent and taking off. Spent just about every day looking for him because he would just leave the yard, even with us calling for him. Tried everything to keep him in yard. Got one of the Sport Dog electric fences, and our problems were immediately resolved. He occasionally runs thru it, but not much. It worked wonders, and did not take long to train him to it. Even when his collar is off, he still stays in yard.


I would go for a retriever instead, they have a history of being more friendly around children and less intense in terms of play. Ours wants to play rough all the time and wears us out with his activity requirements and is a very NEEDY dog. He cannot cope with my husband at work and daughter at school. I do the best I can, but my son and I are not good enough for him. Our yard is also too small and my husband is UNWILLING to build a fence so he can have a yard to run in or to get a bigger house so he can have a basement area to retreat to, or even a place large enough to put a crate--our house is too small for him. You had better not if you place is less than 1500 square feet, has a small yard or you can't put up a fence, and is in a city. This IS NOT AN APARTMENT OR SMALL HOUSE CITY BREED. I have constant trouble because he wants to chase rabbits, cats, squirrels and must be on a leash when he is out all the time. This has made him very unhappy, as he was allowed to run free by his previous owner as a puppy. Unless you have a large property, preferably farm like out in the country I WOULD NOT go for this breed. Ours is wearing me out and wants to run wherever he wants and is always pulling on his leash and finds even an hour long walk too short, even though he gets at least FOUR of them a day. Consider the needs of your wife and children and their energy level before you consider this breed. If you are both young, live in the country, have a large plot of land and a large house where your dog can stretch out and roam, FINE, if not, DON'T. If you DO, GET A PUPPY so you can TRAIN it properly yourself. Don't get one out of a shelter. Ours came to us with worms and Lyme disease and the shelter NEVER told us! He was also reputed to play in the bathtub--he is actually HYDROPHOBIC. Get your puppy USED to baths LONG before he decides he won't take them without a FIGHT. At 50+ lbs. you don't want to have to force your dog into a bathtub, especially one like ours that nips if you touch and he suspects he might be getting a bath. Also don't let him mouth or put his paws on your shoulders, or lap when trying to "play" rough. This is him trying to establish he is "equal" to you. I would suggest you try a female instead a male, she might fight less and submit to you more easily, and make sure she has room to run and hunt! And forget cats or other small dogs, they will not mix well with this breed.


I would go for a retriever instead, they have a history of being more friendly around children and less intense in terms of play. Ours wants to play rough all the time and wears us out with his activity requirements and is a very NEEDY dog. He cannot cope with my husband at work and daughter at school. I do the best I can, but my son and I are not good enough for him. Our yard is also too small and my husband is UNWILLING to build a fence so he can have a yard to run in or to get a bigger house so he can have a basement area to retreat to, or even a place large enough to put a crate--our house is too small for him. You had better not if you place is less than 1500 square feet, has a small yard or you can't put up a fence, and is in a city. This IS NOT AN APARTMENT OR SMALL HOUSE CITY BREED. I have constant trouble because he wants to chase rabbits, cats, squirrels and must be on a leash when he is out all the time. This has made him very unhappy, as he was allowed to run free by his previous owner as a puppy. Unless you have a large property, preferably farm like out in the country I WOULD NOT go for this breed. Ours is wearing me out and wants to run wherever he wants and is always pulling on his leash and finds even an hour long walk too short, even though he gets at least FOUR of them a day. Consider the needs of your wife and children and their energy level before you consider this breed. If you are both young, live in the country, have a large plot of land and a large house where your dog can stretch out and roam, FINE, if not, DON'T. If you DO, GET A PUPPY so you can TRAIN it properly yourself. Don't get one out of a shelter. Ours came to us with worms and Lyme disease and the shelter NEVER told us! He was also reputed to play in the bathtub--he is actually HYDROPHOBIC. Get your puppy USED to baths LONG before he decides he won't take them without a FIGHT. At 50+ lbs. you don't want to have to force your dog into a bathtub, especially one like ours that nips if you touch and he suspects he might be getting a bath. Also don't let him mouth or put his paws on your shoulders, or lap when trying to "play" rough. This is him trying to establish he is "equal" to you. I would suggest you try a female instead a male, she might fight less and submit to you more easily, and make sure she has room to run and hunt! And forget cats or other small dogs, they will not mix well with this breed. drea



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